Composing – How To Write A Song Or Piece, Part 5 expanding chords using the The Circle Of 5ths

To purchase this poster click here

You may have heard of the phrase, The Circle of 5ths. It’s a useful tool for musicians to understand, and for composers and songwriters to use in their pieces. In Part 1 of this series on Composing and Songwriting, I suggested that you start by limiting your piece to just the chords which are built on the C scale (C, Dm, Em, F, G, Am, Bdim) and I provided you with a chart so that you could figure out the seven chords in any key. But perhaps you are now feeling that you want to step outside of the key. For example, if you are in the key of C and want to move to an unexpected B-flat major chord, you can use the circle of 5ths to help navigate your way back to the key of C.

I’m going to let my friend Fred Sokolow take it from here because he is the Circle of 5ths master. Start at 5:30 in the video below and continue on to the end if you would like to join him for his jam:

Fred is an crazy good multi-instrumentalist and has created a small vinyl cling decal of the circle of 5ths for $3 which you can purchase here. You can safely stick it to your piano because there’s no adhesive. (Fred also gives private online lessons in banjo, ukulele, guitar, mandolin and dobro if you are so inclined!) If you have a Paypal account would you consider “tipping” Fred to say thanks for today’s instruction here or search for Fred Sokolow on Venmo? Any amount even $1 or $2 would be appreciated! You can receive notice of Fred’s future mini lessons (there are a lot of great ones!) by joining his mailing list: sokolowmusic@gmail.com. For more jams and free lessons, follow Fred on Facebook.


In classical music there are many ways to structure a piece. Generally when you are starting out, you want to establish a primary theme, move to second theme, then come back to the first theme and end the piece. All of what I wrote about in Parts 1 (chords), 2 (melody), and 3 (melody and chords) are relevant to composing classical music, as well as the Circle of 5ths discussion above, as all melodic music is based upon chords. You can also add lyrics to your classical piece, as with an aria or operatic piece. Feel free to ask questions in our comments below, and please tell us how your songs and pieces are coming along! It would be great to emerge from the Covid quarantine with a few original songs or pieces under your belt!

With love and music, Gaili

Author, Upper Hands Piano: A Method for Adults 50+ to Spark the Mind, Heart and Soul

Composing – How to Write a Song or Piece, Part 4, Lyrics and Structure

I have a piano student who had always wanted to write songs, but just couldn’t seem to get started. When I asked him what he’d like to write about first, he grimaced, “I can’t do it! I’m so uncomfortable!”

“Great!” I replied. “I’m so uncomfortable. That’s your first line.” And he wrote a wonderful, poignant song called, Uncomfortable. If you want to write a song, start from where you are or what you are feeling, and just jump in.

The first step when considering lyric ideas is to get it all down – out of your head, onto paper or into your recording device or app (the Voice Memos app in iPhones is handy). Writers speak of their messy first draft, and the same applies to songwriters. Don’t censor your impulses, just let the ideas flow spontaneously. When you feel you are done, take a break, for at least a few hours. Do something else to clear the palate of your mind, heart and soul.

Then sit back down with your words, read them aloud, and see what you think. Which lines do you love? Which are not flowing well? Have you said what you need to say, or do you need to dig deeper? Or do you want to lighten up the mood a bit? Make notes on your initial impressions, and then get down to work.

If you have started with your lyrics, you will need to begin singing them into a melody. As I have said in Part 3, sometimes it helps to take a walk or drive while singing your lyrics to activate your creative juices in a less pressured environment.

If you have started with a melody, hum the melody and see if any lyric ideas arise from the rhythm of the notes. When the melody dictates the words they are likely to fit really well; but if lyrics arise with a few too many syllables, you can easily add extra notes to your melody.


When writing a popular song, you have two primary kinds of lyrics to consider. The lyrics for the verse, and the lyrics for the chorus. Generally the verse lyrics tell what the song is about. The chorus contains the hook, which is the part of the song we remember best; the chorus lyrics usually repeat, and consist of shorter phrases sung to a memorable melody. The song Every Breath You Take by The Police starts with two verses, each with 5 lyric lines, the last of which repeat in every verse (I’ll be watching you). The chorus reads:

Oh can’t you see, You belong to me. My poor heart aches, With every step you take.

Every Breath You Take has such simple words! Its chords, melodies and structure are also very simple. And yet it was the biggest hit The Police ever had. I’m not suggesting that you write a song with a view to it being huge hit (that’s never a good way to create art), but I do want you to remember that a song doesn’t have to be complicated in order to be really good.

Many songs also contain a bridge. The bridge serves to elevate the song to greater energy or excitement. Every Breath You Take has a bridge at 1:22 consisting of five lyric lines followed by a 16-bar rhythmic instrumental passage.


Some songs also have an instrumental hook such as the Gary Jules recording of Mad World. In Mad World, the piano hook comes as an introduction that repeats in the choruses. Notice also in Mad World that there are two distinct sections to the verses. When that is the case, we call the first section the A, the second section the B:

A: All around me are familiar faces, worn out places, worn out faces. Bright and early for the daily races, going nowhere, going nowhere. Their tears are filling up their glasses, no expression, no expression. Hide my head I want to drown my sorrow, no tomorrow, no tomorrow.

B: And I find it kind of funny, I find it kind of sad. The dreams in which I’m dying are the best I’ve ever had. I find it hard to tell you, I find it hard to take. When people run in circles it’s a very very…

Chorus: Mad world. Mad World.

There is no bridge in Mad World, perhaps because the verses are long, and the B-sections feel like a bridge. Notice that there are a lot of repeated lyrics, which can be a great dramatic tool.


Generally, there are two categories of songs; there are songs that tell a story, and songs that paint a picture. Sometimes you might want to write a song that tells a story about something traumatic or something wonderful that has happened to you, or as with the song Raymond by Brett Eldredge, your song can be like a short story. Other times you might just want to paint a picture for your listener such as Paul McCartney’s Junk, or create an impression about something such as what it feels like to be in love, or to be the victim of discrimination, or how to live a better life.

Some examples of songs that tell a story:

  • Eleanor Rigby, by The Beatles
  • Cats In The Cradle, by Harry Chapin
  • Runaway Love, by Ludacris and Mary J Blige
  • Whisky Lullaby, by Brad Paisley and Alison Krauss
  • Just My Imagination, by The Temptations
  • Fast Car, by Tracy Chapman
  • Raymond, by Brett Eldredge
  • American Pie, by Don McLean
  • Don’t Give Up, by Peter Gabriel
  • Jack and Diane, by John Mellencamp

Some examples of songs that paint a picture, which can include expressing an emotion, giving advice, or making a political statement :

  • Over The Rainbow, by Harold Arlen and Yip Harburg
  • Yellow, by Coldplay
  • Shallow, by Lady Gaga and Bradley Cooper
  • Girl On Fire, by Alicia Keys
  • Thinking Out Loud, by Ed Sheeran
  • Unanswered Prayers, by Garth Brooks
  • Running On Empty, by Jackson Browne
  • Good Riddance, by Green Day
  • Complicated, by Avril Lavigne
  • Under The Table, by Fiona Apple

Let’s take a closer look at a song that incorporates all of the song elements I have discussed so far. I first heard Ben Fold’s song The Luckiest while watching one of the best, most positive movies ever made (in my humble opinion), About Time.

There is an introduction at the beginning of the song, with a piano hook, and for the rest of the song Folds is playing simple major and minor chords which he is constantly breaking up into single notes.

In the A-section, Folds paints a picture of a man who makes mistakes, and he also acknowledges that our mistakes are an important part of who we become:

I don’t get many things right the first time. In fact I am told that a lot. Now I know all the wrong turns, the stumbles, the falls brought me here.

In the B-section of the verse, Folds reveals that he is in a relationship. It is also in the B-sections of The Luckiest that Folds provides the only rhyming lines: day rhyming with face:

And where was I before the day that I first saw your lovely face. Now I see it everyday. And I know that…

And the second B-section rhymes eyes with recognize necessitating a few extra notes for the extra syllables in the word recognize:

In a wide sea of eyes, see one pair that I recognize. And I know that…

The choruses are simply: I am, I am, I am the luckiest.

After the chorus, Folds plays his piano hook again, then another verse and chorus. After the second chorus he provides a short bridge:

I love you more than I have ever found a way to say to you.

Up until now I would unreservedly call The Luckiest a song that paints a picture. But in his third verse Folds tells a story:

Next door there’s an old man who lived into his nineties, and one day passed away in his sleep. And his wife, she stayed for a couple of days and passed away.

In the B-section that follows, the lyrics read: I’m sorry I know that’s a strange way to tell you that I know we belong. So although the song contains a short story, the song is not about that story; Folds simply uses it to illustrate his feelings about his own loving relationship. So, The Luckiest is not a story-song.

While most of the lines in The Luckiest don’t rhyme, almost all of the lines in Every Breath You Take do rhyme. So remember that while some rhymes in your song give the song sing-ability and cohesiveness, you don’t have to rhyme all the time if you don’t want to.


Once you have finished the first draft of your song, take another break from it for at least a day or two. Enjoy your time away and trust that you will take a look with fresh eyes when the time is right. Then come back to fine-tune it. The process of editing is often where creative flow breaks down. Editing your song is a daunting task and the failure to face up to it is why many would-be songwriters never finish their songs. Ask yourself if there are any lyrics, chords or melody notes that aren’t quite there yet. Work on it everyday until you feel good about all of it. Don’t let too many days go by without completing your song, as you run the risk of having nothing but half-finished melodies in your repertoire. On the other hand, you also need to be able to intuit when to stop editing and call it done.

Even if you ultimately decide it’s not very good, finish your song. Completing things is a practice of its own, and we only get better and faster at writing, editing and completing our work though consistent practice. The willingness to edit and complete a song makes the difference between a songwriter and a wannabe.

In classical music there are many ways to structure a piece. Generally when you are starting out, you want to establish a primary theme, move to second theme, then come back to the first theme and end the piece. 

In my next and final post about composing I will expand a little on chords, then will move on to the next musical topic! I hope you have enjoyed analyzing a few good examples of how to put together simple but effective songs. If you are interested in further study, look up some of the songs from the bulleted lists above on Youtube.com and ask yourself questions to deepen your understanding of the writer’s style: What is the structure of the song? Do the verses have a B-section? What are the choruses? Is there a bridge? Does the song tell a story or paint a picture? Are lines repeating? Rhyming? Do some of the verses add extra lyric syllables requiring extra notes?

But don’t analyze too much or for too long. Rather than continually asking what makes a great song, take that time to create one of your own. Remember that your song will be different from anyone else’s because no one has experienced your unique life. You can create something fun or personal that is as beautiful, important and valid as anyone else’s. So get to work!

With love and music, Gaili

Author, Upper Hands Piano: A Method for Adults 50+ to Spark the Mind, Heart and Soul

June Free Sheet Music: Chopsticks Duet!

Red Chopsticks

Although we think of Chopsticks as a quirky beginner’s tune, it is actually not that easy to play! Chopsticks is most fun when we play it as a duet, but if you are sheltering in place, a duet partner might not be so easy to find.

This Chopsticks arrangement has a secondo part that is easy and repetitive enough so that even a non-musical but willing companion in your quarantined life should be able to pick it up with a little patience and practice after watching the video below.

CLICK TO PRINT CHOPSTICKS for 2 or 4 hands

The first page of the sheet music shows an easy secondo accompaniment you can teach your partner by rote. In the video below, my husband is playing the first page secondo part throughout, which is the best choice for a non-pianist. My husband felt most comfortable using his Right Hand 3-4 fingers for F-G, and 2-4 fingers for E-G, but your partner might prefer using just RH 2-3 fingers for both chords. (You can make it even easier by having your partner play just a RH G throughout, instead of RH F-G and E-G.)

The second and third pages add some notes in the secondo part which you can teach to someone who has some piano skills. The primo part changes on each page.

From our Upper Hands Piano Youtube channel

These were the variations I learned as a child, but I bet you know some others! Click Download below for some additional (more advanced) variations that include some fun glissandos:

Chopsticks was originally called The Celebrated Chop Waltz and was composed by a 16-year-old girl named Euphemia Allan, in 1877. Her brother was a music publisher and helped her get it published under the pseudonym Arthur de Lulli. Allan gave this instruction for the primo: “Play both hands turned sideways, little fingers lowest, so that the movement of the hands imitates the chopping from which this waltz gets its name.”

I hope that you are coping as well as possible during this sad and difficult time. If you are sheltering in place, I hope you have a bit of fun learning the Chopsticks duet with a partner! 🎵 😊 🎵

With love and music, Gaili

Composing – first steps (WHO ME?)

With all of the extra time you now have, it is a great time for you to stick your toe into the pool of songwriting. Ok don’t scream, shudder or declare “absolutely not!” before you hear me out. Think about this: We improvise all of the time in our daily lives; when we speak, when we prepare a meal, when we exercise, etc. We are born improvisors, putting things together as we go along. So why not play around a bit on your keyboard just for the fun of it? Or just out of curiosity? Also, improvising is REALLY GREAT for your brain. If you don’t believe me, listen to Charles Limb’s 16 minute Ted Talk and you’ll be fully convinced. Then please read or reread my blog posts about improvising: Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3 to get you started playing to some chord progressions.

If I have convinced you to try improvising, here are some ideas to take you to the next step. First, de-clutter your practice space. Move sheet music you aren’t currently playing away from your field of vision. An open space supports an open, creative mind. Keep your tools (blank manuscript paper, pencils, eraser, pens) neat, clean and visible, so that you’re reminded to practice whenever you pass by. Begin your practice with small steps and low expectations. As Ralph Waldo Emerson said, “Every artist was first an amateur.” Start by setting an intention to just mingle with your keys for 10 minutes a day. Make it part of your healthful daily routines such as brushing your teeth, or eating breakfast. Don’t let your head hit the pillow at night until you’ve jammed on the keyboard for 10 minutes. Notice which musical phrases you liked, and which you didn’t like. Write down the phrases you liked either as notes on manuscript paper (blank sheet music lined paper) or as letters going up or down on the page. You might use the phrases you like in a song later.

If you would like to try to write a song with lyrics, scribble words—any words—on paper for 10 minutes. Write about your angst, your fear, your lethargy, your blank page—whatever the obstacle is feeling like at the moment. I have a piano student who one day realized that he wanted to become a songwriter. When I asked him what he’d like to write about first, he grimaced, “I can’t do it! I’m so uncomfortable!” “Great!” I replied. “That’s your first line.” And he wrote a great song called, Uncomfortable. Or you might write about what or who you love, about your gratitude, or about something fun (remember having fun? call upon those memories even if you aren’t having fun right now!) Just play around with your lyrics ’til you get a couple of lines down that you like. “Fake it ‘til you make it” is great advice. Forget about creating your masterpiece. Just flex the muscles of your imagination. Shake hands with it and take it out for a little spin. Taking those first tentative steps daily, saves us from the tyranny of procrastination. With time, try to become a little braver during your 10 minutes . Trust your creativity more than your fear. As author John A. Shedd said, “A ship in harbor is safe. But that’s not what ships are built for.”  What are you built for? Begin to tap into your own style, voice, and perspective. Get curious and dabble. Then find a small focus towards your creative progress and work on it. For at least 10 minutes each day. Set your phone timer for 10 minutes then forget about time and focus on your art.

In my next post I will help you get started with putting a song (with lyrics) or instrumental piece (without lyrics) together.

How is your piano practice going? Do you find it relaxing to practice? I hope you are coping as well as can be during our quarantine. With love and music, Gaili

Author, Upper Hands Piano: A Method for Adults 50+ to Spark the Mind, Heart and Soul

P.S. If you need a manuscript book for your compositions you can click on the yellow book below to purchase ours on Amazon. You can also check out our Upper Hands Piano instruction book and our Songs of the Seasons: Spring book!

Subscribe (top left) to receive new sheet music coming May 1st!

April Free Sheet Music: Rhapsody In Blue (complete)

Forget-me-not!

Since most of us are confined to our homes with more time to play the piano, I decided to post the complete Rhapsody in Blue today, rather than spreading it out over the next two months. Pages 3-4 present the final and most beloved theme, with a powerful, majestic finish. There are many octaves on the last two pages; if it feels too difficult to play all of the notes for these widespread chords, you can drop the bottom note of each of the right hand chords, and/or drop the top note of each left hand chord. *Note* I also changed the last chord on p. 2 to an arpeggio followed by a fermata, to adhere more closely to the original sheet music. After you play the arpeggio, the fermata signals a pause in the music before continuing on to page 3.

CLICK HERE to print Rhapsody in Blue (complete)

*Remember my free sheet music is only posted for a year, so print it now!*

We have all been so immersed in news of the Coronavirus, I don’t want to write too much about it here, but you can click here to read some suggestions for piano players coping with confinement.

What are you playing right now? How is it going? Leave a comment below and tell us about your piano practice. If you are having any challenges with your playing or your students’ playing, please tell us about them! Perhaps I can offer some advice if you would like it. I am teaching online for about 4-5 hours per day instead of my usual 6-7 hours of in-person lessons, so I have more time too.

I hope you have enjoyed playing Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue. It is a wonderful piece and I have done my best to maintain the integrity of the original sheet music in my intermediate arrangement. With any luck, our social isolation will be over by the time you master the piece! I look forward to the days ahead when we begin to emerge from our cocoons, transformed by the experience of confinement, feeling gratitude for our return to some of life’s simple pleasures.

By the way, this will be my last post on Blog.UpperHandsPiano.com. I will be refocusing on other musical projects that will preclude me creating piano arrangements and discussions. Thanks for joining me these past eight years!

😂😂😂APRIL FOOLS!😂😂😂

Hahaha – Nope, just fooling. I love blogging and arranging music for you, and nothing can keep me away! If you want to receive notice of my free piano sheet music, musical worksheets, exercises and discussions via email, please subscribe! I never share or spam email addresses. Best Wishes for a happier, healthier April. With love and music, Gaili

Author, Upper Hands Piano: A Method for Adults 50+ to Spark the Mind, Heart and Soul. Available on Amazon with instructional videos on Youtube.

February Free Sheet Music: Rhapsody in Blue (Pt. 1)

Piano Friends, I am so excited to offer you a medley of Rhapsody In Blue by George Gershwin! One of the most beloved pieces by an American composer, Rhapsody In Blue just came into the public domain in 2020. I have created an intermediate arrangement which I will post in sections: each month you will receive a new part (if you are a subscriber!) until the piece is complete.

Here’s the Rhapsody In Blue video from Fantasia 2000:

And here is HyeJin Kim playing the full piano solo:

Rhapsody in Blue is a long piece, so I have included most of the main themes and have simplified some (but not all) of the chords. It is such a beautiful piece, and I have strived to maintain the integrity of the harmonies. I hope you enjoy playing it! Do you feel that Rhapsody in Blue is a jazz piece or a classical piece? Please leave your comments below as you are learning it. As with a book club, we can experience playing the piece together, and share our progress!

Another incentive for leaving a comment is that I will be holding a drawing for 20 of these ↗️ sheet music page holders on Valentine’s Day, to express my love and appreciation for my followers! Each time you leave a comment on a post in December, January, and February you are entered to win. (Only one comment per post will yield an entry!) On February 14th I will draw 20 names out of my cloche hat, and will post a video of the drawing as a story on my UpperHandsPiano Instagram account. (Sorry international friends, you must live in the US to win the page holders.)

Have a wonderful month of February 💌 love. Hopefully the groundhog will bring us an early spring tomorrow! But if not, stay cozy and play your piano. Feel the magic of the keys under your fingertips. With love and blue music, Gaili

PS- If you don’t already know about my piano instruction books for adults over 50, you can take a look at them on my website, or on Amazon:

Claire de lune free sheet music reissued!

It has been awhile since I posted, as I was in France and England for 4 weeks, enjoying amazing architecture, music, art, books, and food with my family. One lucky day last spring I received a request to exchange my little house in Los Angeles for this 17th Century chateau in the Cognac region of France 😮 We hadn’t planned on a trip to France, but when someone wants to give you their chateau for 4 weeks, you must at least consider it!

The chateau was located on 300 acres of lush grasslands, lakes, apple orchards and hiking trails. Though it was large (5 bedrooms) and majestic, it was very cozy inside, and we had the time of our lives! Unfortunately the French family did not own a piano, but they had a little keyboard, so I was able to keep my fingers moving 🎹

And of course a few days in Paris (also on a home exchange) brought breathtaking views, wonderful bookstores, music and museums.

While driving through the French countryside, we listened to all kinds of French music: Satie, Debussy, Charles Trenet, Charles Aznavour, and Django Reinhardt.

We flew in and out of London where we got to visit the National Gallery. The Vermeer paintings of women playing a virginal (early harpsichord) were beautiful.

This all brings me to the issue at hand. Ever since I retired the sheet music for Clair de lune from my website I have had almost daily requests for it. I am happy to send it by email, but I thought that I might repost the Clair de lune INTERMEDIATE and EASY sheet music here for those of you who would like to print and play it but missed the original posting.

Click below to print Clair de lune:

Clair de lune INTERMEDIATE sheet music

Click here for a video demonstration of me playing Clair de lune, intermediate.

Clair de lune EASY sheet music

I hope you enjoy playing Clair de lune as much as I have enjoyed listening to it in France! And I have some exciting news: In a few days I will begin posting a medley of the main themes to Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue! I’m so excited that it came into the public domain this year. It’s a long piece, so I am taking the most beloved themes and arranging them for intermediate piano, and I will offer it free to you in installments, starting with February.

Also to celebrate the month of love, I will be hosting another GIVEAWAY in 💌February! I will be giving away 20 Kibkoh sheet music page holders to followers of this blog (in the U.S.) who leave a comment on my post in February. Every comment you leave in December 2019, and January and February 2020, gives you an additional chance to win.

I hope you are staying warm and cozy wherever you are. With love and music, Gaili

It Had To Be You (January Free Sheet Music)

Happy New Year!

It is SO EXCITING when a new year’s worth of songs come into the public domain! As of today, all American songs and pieces written in 1924 are now available, and there are some really great ones I can’t wait to arrange and give to you this year!

One of my favorite 1924 songs is It Had To Be You, by Isham Jones and Gus Kahn. I was first made aware of the song in 1989 when it played under the romantic final scene of the film, When Harry Met Sally starring Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan. In that scene it is New Year’s Eve, and Harry rushes to find and kiss Sally at midnight, while we hear Harry Connick, Jr. sing It Had To Be You in the background. What an iconic piece of film history!

Click below to print an intermediate arrangement of It Had To Be You (and other pieces!) on my Free Sheet Music Page on January 1st 2020:

There is also a funny scene with Diane Keaton singing It Had To Be You in the 1977 film Annie Hall, and it has been recorded by Frank Sinatra, Barbra Streisand, and many others; so you might enjoying listening to some additional recordings on Youtube.com.

Friends, it has been such a pleasure writing this blog, and arranging pieces for you. I have also enjoyed addressing some of the issues that arise for adult piano students, finding short cuts or tools to help you advance your piano studies. We have another GIVEAWAY coming up soon (for 20 sheet music page holders) and I have lots of ideas about things to write about in the coming year; if you have an issue you are struggling with at the piano, please leave a comment below and I will try to help in whatever way I can.

If you don’t already know, I have written a series of piano instruction books called Upper Hands Piano: A Method for Adults 50+ to Spark the Mind, Heart and Soul. Click on the links below to view a few of them on Amazon.com.

I hope you have a wonderful new year, filled with music and magic, love and luck. Do you have any piano goals for 2020? Leave a comment below and let us know what your wishes and intentions are for the coming year. Let us support your musical dreams! With love and music, Gaili

GIVEAWAY! 12 copies of Upper Hands Piano BOOK 1

Since this is the month for expressing gratitude, I would like to say that I am deeply grateful for the work I get to do– blogging about issues of interest to piano players and teachers, composing and arranging music, and playing and teaching piano. I can’t believe that I’ve been teaching piano for over 30 years! It is still the most enjoyable, rewarding (and cozy 🏠) work I can imagine. To give back to the 🎹 community, I try each month to give you the best content I can think of– free sheet music, worksheets, flash cards, and the latest science on the best ways to practice.

Recently I’ve seen book giveaways from 📚Bookstagrammers📚 (people who talk about and review books on Instagram) , and I suddenly thought, “Why not give away some Upper Hands Piano books?” So today I have stacked these 12 copies of Upper Hands Piano, BOOK 1 (a $23.95 value) that I can’t wait to give to my subscribers. These books are 100% brand new, and would make a great holiday gift for any adult who has been wanting to start piano lessons, and just needs a little nudge. They are however last year’s edition and I had to cover the old BLOG address with the current one, with a sliver of adhesive paper. Other than that issue, these books are up to date. If that’s ok with you, then please enter to win one of 12 new copies of Upper Hands Piano, BOOK 1!

GIVEAWAY RULES:

  • You must be a subscriber to this blog 💻
  • ✅You must write a comment on this post: Your favorite holiday song? 🎵Or tell us something about your piano playing? 🎼 Or just say hello!🙋🏽
  • ✅You must be over 18 👩🏾👴🏽
  • ✅You must live in the United States 🇺🇸

The contest closes Saturday November 30th at 12 midnight EST. I will post a video of me picking random names from a hat on my @UpperHandsPiano Instagram stories, and will announce the winners here on my blog (I won’t give out your full name). I will also email the winners (only I see your email address if you leave a comment), and will send the winners a free Upper Hands Piano BOOK 1 via media mail, but you must email me back with your address! Don’t worry, I never share anyone’s information with anyone, ever.

YET ANOTHER GIVEAWAY!

Do you see the little metal gadget on the lower right side of the stack of books in the photo above? Those are called Page Holder Bookmarks, and are incredibly handy for keeping your sheet music books open. I have 20 of them to give away! If you leave a comment on my blog and didn’t win a book, you will be automatically entered to win the Page Holders in my January GIVEAWAY. So stay in touch!

By the way, your chances are pretty good that you will win a book or page holder. Though I have 4,614 subscribers on my blog (including my mom👵🏻 and she is disqualified), they are not very chatty! I get only a few comments each month, and without a comment you will not be entered to win!

Meanwhile, check out some of my former posts on the right ➡️to print free sheet music, flash cards, worksheets and to read about important practice tips. I want to be your resource for making piano lessons as fun and as understandable as possible.

Thanks again for following my blog, and good luck to you! With love and Music, Gaili

P.S. If you’re having trouble subscribing to my blog, send me an email at UpperHandsPiano@gmail.com and I will subscribe you myself. Sorry, this technology is flawed!

Treble Staff Ledger Lines: Free Worksheets

©Alexey Arkhipov Dreamstime.com

A couple of month ago I posted worksheets for learning bass ledger lines, and this month I wanted to follow up with worksheets for learning treble staff ledger lines. In both sets of worksheets I use octaves to help the brain grasp where the notes fall on the keyboard. It really helps to orient yourself on the staff and keyboard when you play notes you know, alongside the notes you might just be guessing at. These treble staff worksheets will train your brain to recognize the notes from three ledger lines below the staff (F3), up to three ledger lines above the staff (E6). I didn’t use numbers such as A4 on the treble worksheets because there is so much confusion about octave numbers. Some editors call the lowest key on a standard piano A0 and others call it A1. In my Upper Hands Piano instruction books for Adults 50+, I call the lowest note on the piano A1, which makes middle C, C4, because that seems to be the system most agreed upon. If you find the key numbers confusing don’t worry about learning them. They are just a learning tool, and work better for some than for others. Practice these treble note worksheets a few lines at a time, eventually playing all the lines from 1-16 at one sitting.

CLICK HERE TO PRINT TREBLE STAFF LEDGER LINES WORKSHEETS

I hope you are still able to play your piano in these dog days of summer. It is hot and humid here in Southern California, but of course it has not been nearly as bad as in many cities around the world this week.

In a few days I will be posting the free sheet music for August- I have arranged a few classical favorites that my blog followers have requested in their comments. I love getting your requests! Keep in mind that I can only post songs and pieces written before 1924 (i.e. in the public domain), for free.

Have you set an intention to learn a certain song or piece this summer? Let us know what you are playing so that we can support your efforts! Stay cool, with love and music, Gaili

Author, Upper Hands Piano: A Method for Adults 50+ to Spark the Mind, Heart and Soul

P.S. If you have a GMAIL account and would like for these posts to come to your Primary mailbox instead of your Promotions mailbox, just drag the (unopened) email up left into your Primary tab, and, and they will arrive in your Primary mailbox forevermore 😎