Make A List

© Lnmstuff

Don’t you love lists? When I see articles written with lists such as The Twenty Greenest Cities To Live In, The Best Tacos in Los Angeles, The 50 Most Life-Changing Novels Of All Time, 7 Reasons Why You Should Lift Weights1,000 Places To See Before You Die, or The Top 10 Foods For Brain Health, I’m already hooked.

Of course if you had 20 people tell you where they eat the best taco in LA, you’d probably get 20 different answers. And how can anyone really give an objective rating of literature? Rankings are of course completely subject to taste and preferences, but still, it’s fun to see recommendations for cities I might like to live in, and new books I might like to read.

Some lists become famous, like The 10 Commandments, The Bill of Rights, and Schindler’s List!

I’d like all of the students reading this to take some time to make a list of their top 10 favorite songs and pieces. Any style of music is fine. Do you love a piece by Chopin that sounds impossible to play? Write it down anyway, because your teacher can find a simplified arrangement or can arrange the main theme for you during your lesson. We often love the songs we heard when we were in high school or college. If you want to play one of those, write it down. You might also like movie themes or songs from musicals. Go on Youtube.com and research your favorite artists, composers or songwriters and remind yourself of the music you love. I recently heard on NPR that some of the music we most strongly connect to is the music our parents listened to when we were young, so think about their songs too.

We learn the best when we are motivated to practice. If you are playing music you love, music that stirs your soul, you’ll have the best chance of progressing. Keep the list in your lesson assignment book so that you can draw from it in the future. Of course you need to practice your exercises, keep learning your chords and read music that is at your level. But make playing the songs you love, your reward for the hard work of learning to play the piano.

With love and music, Gaili

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2 Replies to “Make A List”

  1. Rachmaninoff’s Nocturne I find the left hand impossible to play as is, so I play octaves instead of 12ths. Rachmaninoff did have big hands alright.

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