You Made Me Love You and Giveaway!

In just a few days I will hold my drawing for 20 Sheet Music page holders! All who have left a comment since December have been entered to win! This is an essential little tool to use with our Upper Hands Piano™ and Piano Powered™ method books, but also for any sheet music books you play with. Leave a comment today and you are entered to win a sheet music page holder! (Sorry, you must live in the USA to win)

Since I posted the first installment of Rhapsody In Blue for my February Free Sheet Music , I wanted to also give you a love song to play for Valentine’s Day. One of my favorite love songs is You Made Me Love You. I love this recording by Harry James with singer Helen Forrest. (It was featured in the Woody Allen film, Hannah and Her Sisters.) Click the sheet music below to print:

Remember to leave a comment to enter! I will post a video of the live drawing on my Instagram stories (@UpperHandsPiano) so you can see if you won, right away. The drawing will be on February 14th of course!

I hope you enjoy a wonderful February with the ones you love, whether it be your honey, your friends, your parents, children or pets. Thanks for being my blog Valentine! With lots of love and music, Gaili 🌹💌🌹

February Free Sheet Music: Rhapsody in Blue (Pt. 1)

Piano Friends, I am so excited to offer you a medley of Rhapsody In Blue by George Gershwin! One of the most beloved pieces by an American composer, Rhapsody In Blue just came into the public domain in 2020. I have created an intermediate arrangement which I will post in sections: each month you will receive a new part (if you are a subscriber!) until the piece is complete.

Here’s the Rhapsody In Blue video from Fantasia 2000:

And here is HyeJin Kim playing the full piano solo:

Rhapsody in Blue is a long piece, so I have included most of the main themes and have simplified some (but not all) of the chords. It is such a beautiful piece, and I have strived to maintain the integrity of the harmonies. I hope you enjoy playing it! Do you feel that Rhapsody in Blue is a jazz piece or a classical piece? Please leave your comments below as you are learning it. As with a book club, we can experience playing the piece together, and share our progress!

Another incentive for leaving a comment is that I will be holding a drawing for 20 of these ↗️ sheet music page holders on Valentine’s Day, to express my love and appreciation for my followers! Each time you leave a comment on a post in December, January, and February you are entered to win. (Only one comment per post will yield an entry!) On February 14th I will draw 20 names out of my cloche hat, and will post a video of the drawing as a story on my UpperHandsPiano Instagram account. (Sorry international friends, you must live in the US to win the page holders.)

Have a wonderful month of February 💌 love. Hopefully the groundhog will bring us an early spring tomorrow! But if not, stay cozy and play your piano. Feel the magic of the keys under your fingertips. With love and blue music, Gaili

PS- If you don’t already know about my piano instruction books for adults over 50, you can take a look at them on my website, or on Amazon:

Claire de lune free sheet music reissued!

It has been awhile since I posted, as I was in France and England for 4 weeks, enjoying amazing architecture, music, art, books, and food with my family. One lucky day last spring I received a request to exchange my little house in Los Angeles for this 17th Century chateau in the Cognac region of France 😮 We hadn’t planned on a trip to France, but when someone wants to give you their chateau for 4 weeks, you must at least consider it!

The chateau was located on 300 acres of lush grasslands, lakes, apple orchards and hiking trails. Though it was large (5 bedrooms) and majestic, it was very cozy inside, and we had the time of our lives! Unfortunately the French family did not own a piano, but they had a little keyboard, so I was able to keep my fingers moving 🎹

And of course a few days in Paris (also on a home exchange) brought breathtaking views, wonderful bookstores, music and museums.

While driving through the French countryside, we listened to all kinds of French music: Satie, Debussy, Charles Trenet, Charles Aznavour, and Django Reinhardt.

We flew in and out of London where we got to visit the National Gallery. The Vermeer paintings of women playing a virginal (early harpsichord) were beautiful.

This all brings me to the issue at hand. Ever since I retired the sheet music for Clair de lune from my website I have had almost daily requests for it. I am happy to send it by email, but I thought that I might repost the Clair de lune INTERMEDIATE and EASY sheet music here for those of you who would like to print and play it but missed the original posting.

Click below to print Clair de lune:

Clair de lune INTERMEDIATE sheet music

Click here for a video demonstration of me playing Clair de lune, intermediate.

Clair de lune EASY sheet music

I hope you enjoy playing Clair de lune as much as I have enjoyed listening to it in France! And I have some exciting news: In a few days I will begin posting a medley of the main themes to Gershwin’s Rhapsody in Blue! I’m so excited that it came into the public domain this year. It’s a long piece, so I am taking the most beloved themes and arranging them for intermediate piano, and I will offer it free to you in installments, starting with February.

Also to celebrate the month of love, I will be hosting another GIVEAWAY in 💌February! I will be giving away 20 Kibkoh sheet music page holders to followers of this blog (in the U.S.) who leave a comment on my post in February. Every comment you leave in December 2019, and January and February 2020, gives you an additional chance to win.

I hope you are staying warm and cozy wherever you are. With love and music, Gaili

It Had To Be You (January Free Sheet Music)

Happy New Year!

It is SO EXCITING when a new year’s worth of songs come into the public domain! As of today, all American songs and pieces written in 1924 are now available, and there are some really great ones I can’t wait to arrange and give to you this year!

One of my favorite 1924 songs is It Had To Be You, by Isham Jones and Gus Kahn. I was first made aware of the song in 1989 when it played under the romantic final scene of the film, When Harry Met Sally starring Billy Crystal and Meg Ryan. In that scene it is New Year’s Eve, and Harry rushes to find and kiss Sally at midnight, while we hear Harry Connick, Jr. sing It Had To Be You in the background. What an iconic piece of film history!

Click below to print an intermediate arrangement of It Had To Be You (and other pieces!) on my Free Sheet Music Page on January 1st 2020:

There is also a funny scene with Diane Keaton singing It Had To Be You in the 1977 film Annie Hall, and it has been recorded by Frank Sinatra, Barbra Streisand, and many others; so you might enjoying listening to some additional recordings on Youtube.com.

Friends, it has been such a pleasure writing this blog, and arranging pieces for you. I have also enjoyed addressing some of the issues that arise for adult piano students, finding short cuts or tools to help you advance your piano studies. We have another GIVEAWAY coming up soon (for 20 sheet music page holders) and I have lots of ideas about things to write about in the coming year; if you have an issue you are struggling with at the piano, please leave a comment below and I will try to help in whatever way I can.

If you don’t already know, I have written a series of piano instruction books called Upper Hands Piano: A Method for Adults 50+ to Spark the Mind, Heart and Soul. Click on the links below to view a few of them on Amazon.com.

I hope you have a wonderful new year, filled with music and magic, love and luck. Do you have any piano goals for 2020? Leave a comment below and let us know what your wishes and intentions are for the coming year. Let us support your musical dreams! With love and music, Gaili

When You Lose Your Place In Your Music

One of the biggest issues piano students struggle with when their hands have to jump more than a few keys, is finding their location on the keyboard without losing their place in their sheet music. In Chopin’s Waltz in A minor, the left hand has to leap to get from the single note to the chord in each bass staff measure:

All but the most experienced pianists must constantly look down at their hands in order to hit the correct bass notes in passages like this, and that can cause the student to lose their tempo as well as their place on the page.

There are a few things we can do to improve our geographical sense on the keyboard. But before I talk about strategies, I would like you to consider that the spatial aspect of playing the piano provides one of its greatest brain benefits.

While all instrumentalists get a brain boost from the multi-sensory experience of playing their instruments — integrating the visual (seeing), auditory (hearing), and tactile (touching) senses with rhythmic awareness, pattern perception, memory and emotions — a piano player develops the broadest spatial intelligence, which means developing an instinct for how far to move one’s hand to play the intended keys. Brain scans reveal that because of this additional challenge, playing the piano activates the most widespread portions of the brain, improving brain structure and cognitive functioning, by increasing the number and health of brain cells and neural connections. So let’s view piano key leaps as a good thing! 😉💡👏

In a book I think of as my learning science bible called, Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning, the authors recount interesting scientific data they call the “Beanbag Study.” In the study, two groups of children practiced throwing beanbags into a bucket; one group tossing from three feet away, the other tossing from both two and four feet away. After twelve weeks, both groups were tested on tossing into a bucket three feet away. Surprisingly, “the kids who did the best by far were those who’d practiced on two- and four-foot buckets” even though they had never tried the three- foot buckets! (Make It Stick, p.46.) This is because varied practice (such as tossing beanbags from mixed distances) gives you a deeper understanding of how you need to move your body to learn a visual/spatial skill. You can adapt these findings when practicing piano key leaps by doing the following exercises :

  1. Keep your eyes forward, then practice moving each of your hands in octaves (from one C to a higher or lower C) and other intervals (G up to E, D down to F; B up to A, C down to D, etc.) by taking just a quick glance at your hand as it approaches the second key.
  2. Practice moving each of your hands in octaves and other intervals up and down, with your eyes closed, seeing how close you can get to your intended key. You can graze the tops of the black keys with your fingers to guide you; that’s how blind pianists learn to play.
  3. In the same way, work up to finding intervals greater than an octave (nine keys or more) with just a quick glance down, and later with your eyes closed.
Finding notes with your eyes closed is a great exercise!

By developing an intuition for distances between keys, we reduce the need for constantly looking down from our music, or we reduce the length of time we need to look down, to a quick glance. If you do need to look down at your hands for a piece such as Chopin’s Waltz in A minor (above), you can do the following to help keep your place in the music:

  1. Don’t let yourself look down until you make a mental note of where you are on the page, even though that will interrupt your tempo.
  2. If you notice that you consistently get lost in a particular measure, get out some colored pencils and make a mark above that measure. If there is more than one, number each measure in which you get lost, so that when you need to look down, your brain quickly registers red 1, blue 2, green 3, etc. When you look back up you will quickly find the red 1 your eyes just left a moment ago.

Sometimes you lose your place because you have memorized part of your music, but not all of it. For that issue as well, use colored numbers above the measures in which you consistently lose your place. Once you stop losing your place, you can erase the markings, as well as other penciled markings on your page that you no longer need.

Give these practice strategies a try and leave us a comment to let us know how it went. As with all new skills, you will get better with time and practice, so don’t get discouraged if the exercises doesn’t work too well for you at the beginning.

FYI- You only have a few more days to print Auld Lang Syne from the FREE SHEET MUSIC page of my website, before last JANUARY’s arrangement disappears. Everyone loves to sing that song at the stroke of midnight on New Year’s Eve, even if they don’t know exactly what the lyrics mean 😆

I hope you find your way to the 🎹 bench amidst the holiday rush; playing the piano is a great way to relax and re-center yourself. Happy Holidays! Thanks so much for joining our community. With love and music, Gaili

Gaili Schoen

Author, Upper Hands Piano: A Method for Adults 50+ to Spark the Mind, Heart and Soul

O Holy Night & Giveaway Winners!

For the past two months I have asked my subscribers what their favorite holiday songs are, and the winner is the Christmas carol, O Holy Night, written by French composer Adolph-Charles Adam in 1847. O Holy Night was recorded by Mariah Carey in 1994, Celine Dion in 2004, and Andrea Bocelli in 2009, amongst many others!

I have written an early intermediate arrangement in the key of C in hopes that you will be able to learn it by Christmas! You’ll find a lot of fingering in this arrangement, but as always, if you find a fingering you like better, feel free to cross mine out, and add your own. Whatever fingering you use, try to keep it consistent. The quickest way to learn a piece is to practice it slowly, being vigilant about the fingering as you gradually increase your tempo over the days and weeks.

PRINT: O HOLY NIGHT

(O Holy Night will only be available on my website for year, so if you want a copy after November 2020 leave a comment below and I will send it to you)

✡️✡️✡️ If you would like a copy of the song Sevivon to play for Chanukah, leave a comment below this post and I will email it to you! ✡️✡️✡️

It’s time to announce the winners of the 12 copies of Upper Hands Piano: BOOK 1! If you are on Instagram, head over to my @UpperHandsPiano account (tonight or tomorrow) to watch the videos of me reaching into my hat and picking the 12 winners in my STORIES. My husband took the videos of me grabbing the 12 names, so you can see that I picked them randomly. I will be emailing the 12, but if they don’t write me back with their addresses within the week, I will choose additional names from the hat!!

Here are the winners: 1-Donna, 2-Ann, 3-Sarah (with @att.net email), 4-Linda, 5- Catherine, 6-Vicki M, 7-Amy, 8-Sandra, 9-Patricia, 10-Kathy B, 11-Mary K, 12-Joni

🎇CONGRATULATIONS!!!🎇

And remember, everyone that wasn’t chosen today is automatically entered to win one of the 20 the Kibcoh sheet music page holders I’m giving away in January!

Thanks so much for playing along with me! I just loved reading your comments- it gave me a better idea of who is reading my blog posts, and what their needs might be (teacher/student etc.) Happy Holidays and thanks so much for subscribing!

GIVEAWAY! 12 copies of Upper Hands Piano BOOK 1

Since this is the month for expressing gratitude, I would like to say that I am deeply grateful for the work I get to do– blogging about issues of interest to piano players and teachers, composing and arranging music, and playing and teaching piano. I can’t believe that I’ve been teaching piano for over 30 years! It is still the most enjoyable, rewarding (and cozy 🏠) work I can imagine. To give back to the 🎹 community, I try each month to give you the best content I can think of– free sheet music, worksheets, flash cards, and the latest science on the best ways to practice.

Recently I’ve seen book giveaways from 📚Bookstagrammers📚 (people who talk about and review books on Instagram) , and I suddenly thought, “Why not give away some Upper Hands Piano books?” So today I have stacked these 12 copies of Upper Hands Piano, BOOK 1 (a $23.95 value) that I can’t wait to give to my subscribers. These books are 100% brand new, and would make a great holiday gift for any adult who has been wanting to start piano lessons, and just needs a little nudge. They are however last year’s edition and I had to cover the old BLOG address with the current one, with a sliver of adhesive paper. Other than that issue, these books are up to date. If that’s ok with you, then please enter to win one of 12 new copies of Upper Hands Piano, BOOK 1!

GIVEAWAY RULES:

  • You must be a subscriber to this blog 💻
  • ✅You must write a comment on this post: Your favorite holiday song? 🎵Or tell us something about your piano playing? 🎼 Or just say hello!🙋🏽
  • ✅You must be over 18 👩🏾👴🏽
  • ✅You must live in the United States 🇺🇸

The contest closes Saturday November 30th at 12 midnight EST. I will post a video of me picking random names from a hat on my @UpperHandsPiano Instagram stories, and will announce the winners here on my blog (I won’t give out your full name). I will also email the winners (only I see your email address if you leave a comment), and will send the winners a free Upper Hands Piano BOOK 1 via media mail, but you must email me back with your address! Don’t worry, I never share anyone’s information with anyone, ever.

YET ANOTHER GIVEAWAY!

Do you see the little metal gadget on the lower right side of the stack of books in the photo above? Those are called Page Holder Bookmarks, and are incredibly handy for keeping your sheet music books open. I have 20 of them to give away! If you leave a comment on my blog and didn’t win a book, you will be automatically entered to win the Page Holders in my January GIVEAWAY. So stay in touch!

By the way, your chances are pretty good that you will win a book or page holder. Though I have 4,614 subscribers on my blog (including my mom👵🏻 and she is disqualified), they are not very chatty! I get only a few comments each month, and without a comment you will not be entered to win!

Meanwhile, check out some of my former posts on the right ➡️to print free sheet music, flash cards, worksheets and to read about important practice tips. I want to be your resource for making piano lessons as fun and as understandable as possible.

Thanks again for following my blog, and good luck to you! With love and Music, Gaili

P.S. If you’re having trouble subscribing to my blog, send me an email at UpperHandsPiano@gmail.com and I will subscribe you myself. Sorry, this technology is flawed!

November Free Sheet Music: Over The River and Through The Woods

When the calendar flips to November the first thing we Americans think about is Thanksgiving. To celebrate our beloved holiday, I am posting the classic Thanksgiving song we all know and love, Over The River and Through The Woods.

This is an easy arrangement for piano, vocals and guitar, and your friends who play violin or flute can also look over your shoulder and jam with you at your Thanksgiving Day celebration! Kids love this song, so you might like to teach your children, grandchildren, nieces or nephews the words, to sing along.

PRINT: Over The River and Through The Woods

(This sheet music will only be posted on my website for a year, so if you are reading this post and the sheet music is no long available at UpperHandsPiano.com, just send me an email at UpperHandsPiano@gmail.com and I will happily send it to you.)

This arrangement of Over The River and Through The Woods came from my Songs of the Seasons, AUTUMN Book which you can click on below, to view on Amazon. There are a lot of great easy-to-intermediate arrangements of holiday songs in the Songs of the Seasons series, especially the WINTER book (also below).

Next month I would also like to post some free holiday sheet music for you. Please leave a comment below and let me know which holiday song you would like me to arrange. There are so many great ones, so I need your votes! It has to have been published before 1923, so I can’t give away songs such as White Christmas, or Hanukkah in Santa Monica 😄. But any of the older classics would be great. What’s your favorite vintage holiday tune?

Stay well and enjoy your playing! 🎹 With love and Music, Gaili

Gaili Schoen, Author, Upper Hands Piano: A Method for Adults 50+ to Spark the Mind, Heart and Soul

Runnin’ Wild! (Marilyn Monroe) Free Sheet Music

In Upper Hands Piano: BOOK 2 the song Runnin’ Wild (from the film, Some Like It Hot) appears on p. 10 as a “lead sheet” ( just a melody line with chord symbols). Some Like It Hot stars Marilyn Monroe, with Tony Curtis and Jack Lemmon in drag playing in her all-women band. Here’s a video of Marilyn singing Runnin’ Wild from Some Like It Hot.

Besides loving the song and the movie, I also used Runnin’ Wild in BOOK 2 because it has a simple right hand melody, which gives the piano student the opportunity to focus on the numerous left hand major and minor triads. This sheet music helps the student to really learn the notes of the chords, and to get used to intuiting the distances between each chord. While later in BOOK 2 the student learns chord inversions which reduce some of that hand movement, students still need to practice the skill of finding chords quickly, until those distances becomes more instinctual. Here’s why: if you develop a strong sense of how far to move your hands between the keys, you won’t have to look down at your hands as much. That means you can play faster and more accurately, and you won’t lose your place as often. Here is the original sheet music for Runnin’ Wild from Upper Hands Piano: BOOK 2 which you can click to print:

As promised on p. 10, here is Runnin’ Wild in 6 additional keys, to give you even more practice playing chords on your keyboard.

Another great way to practice Runnin’ Wild is to find a key amongst these seven versions that works for your voice, and sing along as you play. Singing and playing is a great way to boost your brain power, increase your focus and improve your rhythm, and it’s also great for training your ear.

Have a Happy Halloween! If you are wanting to play some spooky music, click here to print the Toccata from Bach’s ominous Toccata and Fugue, or click here to print a simplified piano arrangement of Chopin’s Funeral March (from my October 2017 post!):

Thanks for following my blog! With love and music, Gaili

Author, Upper Hands Piano: A Method for Adults 50+ to Spark the Mind, Heart and Soul

How to Build Chords on the Piano, Part 3 – 6th and 7th chords

Welcome to Part 3 of How to Build Chords on the Piano! In this video I explain how to build 6th chords, and 7th, MAJOR 7th and MINOR 7th chords. I refer to the “formulas” we covered in Part 1, so you might want to review Part 1 first if you don’t know what I mean by chord fomulas.

(Click if you would like to enlarge on Youtube.com: https://youtu.be/X4di8DIQy6A)

It is important to understand chords and chord symbols if you want to play popular music using sheet music or fake books. However even classical pianists benefit from understanding chords as they show up in most all classical music, sometimes broken (1 or 2 notes at a time), sometimes block (all notes of the chord played at once). The better you are at recognizing a chord when you play it, the faster you will learn your piece, because you will understand what it is you are playing. And since I am all about tools that provide short cuts to deeper understanding, I have created a set of flash cards for 7th, Major 7th, and Minor 7th chords, in both treble and bass staves. As I stated in the above video, print out just set at a time, writing the answers lightly in pencil on the back of each card. For example, when you print out the set of Major 7th cards, all you will have to know at first is the root. If you see the root (bottom note) is an F-sharp, you can write F#Maj7 on the back, since you already know that the whole set consists of Major 7ths. Write the answers on the back of each card in each set before printing the next set. Once you have all the cards labeled, mix up all of the cards, and start quizzing yourself at the piano.

According to the learning science bible called, Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning, self-testing or “retrieval” is one of the very best ways to learn:

One of the most striking research findings is the power of active retrieval — testing — to strengthen memory…. The act of retrieving learning from memory has two profound benefits. One, it tells you what you know and don’t know, and therefore where to focus further study…. Two, recalling what you have learned causes your brain to reconsolidate the memory, which strengthens its connections to what you already know and makes it easier to recall in the future.” — From Make It Stick pp. 19-20

Regarding using flash cards, Make It Stick states: “…don’t stop quizzing yourself on the cards that you answer correctly a couple of times. Continue to shuffle them into the deck until they are well mastered. Only then set them aside — but in a pile that you revisit periodically….Anything you want to remember must be periodically recalled from memory.” (p. 204)

Aside from the flashcards I will often ask my students to tell me what (broken or block) chord they are playing in various measures of their classical sheet music. Then I have them write the chord symbol (as triads, slash chord inversions, or 7ths etc.) above the notes of the chord for practice. You can do this yourself; see if you can identify chords in your pieces. If the notes don’t seem to form any recognizable chord, try another measure, or have your teacher point to notes that form a chord you have studied here (Major/Minor/Diminished/Augmented Triads, 1st and 2nd inversions of Major Triads, and 6th and 7th Chords). You will see that chords are everywhere! And in fact, nearly all western music is made up of chords, which add beautiful 🎨 color 🎨 to music.

NOTE: ALL FLASHCARDS MUST BE PRINTED IN LANDSCAPE ORIENTATION (wide/horizontal) INSTEAD OF PORTRAIT (tall/vertical) IN YOUR PRINTER SETTINGS.

Click “Download” below to print Major 7th chord flashcards:

Click “Download” below to print 7th chord flashcards:

Click “Download” below to print Minor 7th chord flashcards:

I hope you find these flashcards and the instructional video above helpful to your piano studies. Feel free to share these media with other piano students and teachers. They are not included with my piano instruction books Upper Hands Piano: A Method for Adults 50+ to Spark the Mind, Heart and Soul or my Songs of the Seasons books (see below) but I hope that all who have purchased the books (Thank you VERY MUCH! 🙋🏻) will find their way to this post. If you’re new to this blog, check out the navigation bar to the right to see if there is any free sheet music you would like to print, including my recent Toccata piano arrangement for Halloween 🎃. Please comment and let us know how you are doing with these three posts on building chords!

With love and Music, Gaili